The Book of Titus

Today we’re going to study Titus, chapter 1; so let’s start with Paul’s introduction to the epistle, verses 1-4…

“1 Paul a seruant of God, and an Apostle of Iesus Christ, according to the Faith of Gods Elect, and the acknowledging of the trueth which is after godlinesse,
2 In hope of eternall life, which God that cannot lie, promised before the world began:
3 But hath in due times manifested his word through preaching, which is committed vnto mee according to the commandement of God our Sauiour:
4 To Titus mine owne Sonne after the common faith, Grace, mercie, and peace from God the Father, and the Lord Iesus Christ our Sauiour.”

Here Paul describes himself as “a servant of God, and an apostle.” The term “servant of God” is more of the general term for what Paul was, whereas the term “apostle” is the specific position that he held; Paul was a servant of God, what kind of servant of God? he was an apostle, in particular.

And an apostle is the highest position within the Church; 1 Corinthians 12:28 says that, “… God hath set some in the Church, first Apostles, secondarily Prophets, thirdly Teachers …”, etc, but it all starts with apostles; it says that they’re first.

And it’s cool that even though Paul held the highest position of leadership, he still viewed himself humbly, as a servant. And this speaks of the servant-leadership principle that Jesus taught. Jesus said, “… he that is greatest among you shall be your servant …” (Matthew 23:11). So if you want to do something great for God, if you want to be a leader in Christ’s Church, you have to view yourself as a servant; a servant puts the needs of others before himself.
Now continuing in Titus 1:1, Paul says that he’s a “… seruant of God, and an Apostle of Iesus Christ, according to the Faith of Gods Elect”; so take note of that last phrase: according to the faith of God’s elect. Paul was saying that the proof of his position of leadership was the faith of God’s elect; so it was the people that Paul got saved, and the people that Paul edified, who were, themselves, the proof that Paul was a servant of God, and an apostle.

And Paul spoke this same way to the believers at Corinth. In 1 Corinthians 9:1 Paul asked them, “Am I not an Apostle?” And then, in the next verse, Paul said, “If I bee not an Apostle vnto others, yet doubtlesse I am to you: for the seale of mine Apostleship are yee in the Lord.” The believers at Corinth, themselves, were the seal, or the proof of Paul’s apostleship… And so the proof of any great servant of God are the Christians that he gets saved, and the Christians that he edifies. Christian leaders build the Church of God, and they do that by saving the lost and by edifying the saved.

Now look at the last part of Titus 1:1, it reads: “… and the acknowledging of the trueth which is after godlinesse.” That’s saying that we Christians acknowledge the truth of Christ by displaying godly behavior. In other words, we show the truth of Christ, we show our faith… by our works. It’s like how Paul showed that he was a servant of God by the people that he got saved- Paul showed his faith by his works, in that sense, too.

And this is what James was talking about in his epistle. James said, quote: “… I will shew thee my faith by my workes” (Ja 2:18). The book of James is often misunderstood; he’s not saying that you have to have works in order to be saved; he’s saying that if you want to prove that you’re saved to other people, you prove it to them by your works.

So let’s go on to Titus 1, verse 2; which reads: “In hope of eternall life, which God that cannot lie, promised before the world began.” So here we see a definition of “faith” is, quote: “the hope of eternall life.” The gospel message is that Jesus saves us from hell, and he gives us eternal life instead, if we put our faith on him. And so you see how faith can be described as the hope of eternal life.

Hebrews 11:1 says that “… faith is the substance of things hoped for, the euidence of things not seen.” So faith is believing in or hoping in something that you have not seen. Our eyes have not seen Jesus rise from the grave. Our eyes have not seen Jesus’ return to reign and to judge. But we believe it! We believe that Jesus died for our sins, and that he rose from the grave, and that he will return. And we believe that Jesus gave us the same eternal life that he has. And we believe in all of this and we hope in all of this even though we haven’t seen any of it with our eyes.

And why do we believe it? Well we believe it because God promised it; God promised us eternal life through faith on Jesus… and God. Cannot. Lie. Look at Titus 1:2 again: “In hope of eternall life, which God that cannot lie, promised before the world began.” God’s promise of eternal life is good because God cannot lie. And so if you know the character of God, if you know that he cannot lie, then you know that his word is good, and you can put your faith in his promises.

And isn’t it interesting that God cannot lie? God is all-powerful but, even though he’s all-powerful, there are still things that he cannot do… There’s nothing evil in God, so he can’t do anything evil; that means he can’t sin, and that means that he can’t lie.

You know, God’s not the creator of lying; Satan created lying. Jesus said this of Satan, quote: “…there is no truth in him. When he speaketh a lie, he speaketh of his owne: for he is a liar, and the father of it” (John 8:44). And so Satan is the father of lies; Satan created lying, not God.

And the fact that God did not create lying actually disproves one of the false tenants of Calvinism. Calvinism teaches that everything that happens has been predestined by God to happen; Calvinism teaches that when something evil happens, it’s God that predestined that evil thing to happen. And so Calvinism teaches that when people lie, it’s God that predestined them to lie. But, no, that’s a false teaching. God is not the creator of lying; God cannot lie himself, and so God doesn’t predestine other people to lie either… When we lie, we’re using our own free will to choose to sin, and to choose to go against God. James wrote, “Let no man say when he is tempted, I am tempted of God: for God cannot be tempted with euill, neither tempteth he any man. But euery man is tempted, when hee is drawen away of his owne lust, and entised” (Ja 1:13-14).

Now let’s go to Titus 1, verses 3 and 4; and that reads: “But hath in due times manifested his word through preaching, which is committed vnto mee according to the commandement of God our Sauiour: to Titus mine owne Sonne after the common faith, Grace, mercie, and peace from God the Father, and the Lord Iesus Christ our Sauiour.”

So God made his gospel promise even before the world began. And that’s another reason why we can believe the gospel: because it was promised before time even started… Which is kind of deep to think about.

And Paul says that in these latter times, the gospel promise is manifested through preaching, and that the preaching of the gospel had been committed to Paul by the commandment of God our Savior. Jesus spoke directly to Paul, in a vision, and told him to preach the gospel. But each of us have a command from Jesus to preach the gospel too. In Mark 16, Jesus said: “… Goe yee into all the world, and preach the Gospel to euery creature. He that beleeueth and is baptized, shalbe saued, but he that beleeueth not, shall be damned” (Mk 16:15-16). So each of us have Paul’s same general commission that Paul had: to go and preach the gospel to everyone in our generation.

Now a part of the gospel is understanding who Jesus is: Jesus is God. And it is so amazing to think that God would come to earth as a man, and actually sacrifice himself to save mankind… that’s the gospel!… And so look again at Titus 1, verses 3 and 4, because I want to show you how these verses use the KJV’s Built-In Dictionary to tell us that Jesus is God… As you guys know, the KJV dictionary works by exchanging words or phrases in order to define those words or phrases. So the last phrase in verse 3 is “God our Sauiour”; and the last phrase in verse 4 is “Iesus Christ our Sauiour.” So one verse says that God is our Savior, and the next verse says that Jesus is our Savior; and that’s the KJV dictionary interchanging the word “God” with the word “Jesus,” to tell us that Jesus is God.

The gospel, and Jesus’ divinity, in particular, are some of the themes of the book of Titus. And, in chapter 2, Titus actually directly says that Jesus is God; look at Titus 2:13: “Looking for that blessed hope, and the glorious appearing of the great God and our Saviour Jesus Christ.” So, there, Jesus is directly called, “the great God,” and “our Saviour.” It’s clear: Jesus is God.

So that pretty much concludes Paul’s intro to the book of Titus; except also note that, in verse 4, Paul calls Titus, “mine owne Sonne after the common faith.” And so, apparently, Paul got Titus saved too, which means that Titus’ faith was one of those proofs of Paul’s apostleship.

And Paul calling Titus his son also shows us that it’s Ok to think of people, that get saved through our preaching, as our own children, as our spiritual children; it’s not taking glory away from God to say to someone, “You’re my son in the faith.” It’s biblical to call someone, that you get saved, your son or daughter.

Again, Paul uses similar language when speaking to the Corinthians; in 1 Corinthians 4:15, Paul says, “For though you haue ten thousand instructors in Christ, yet haue yee not many fathers: For in Christ Iesus I haue begotten you through the Gospel.” So if you preach the gospel to someone and they get saved, it’s proper to think of yourself as their father, and to think of them as your child… And with this relationship comes responsibility; I mean, you shouldn’t just beget people, you shouldn’t just get them saved, and then forget about them. You should also raise them in the Lord; you should edify them and teach them, and lead them by example; in 1 Corinthians 4, Paul went on to say to the Corinthians: “… For in Christ Iesus I haue begotten you through the Gospel. Wherefore I beseech you, be yee followers of me” (1 Cor 4:15-16); our concern for people is to both get them saved, and to raise them up- to edify them, in the Lord.

Anyway, that’s the end of Paul’s intro to the book of Titus, now let’s turn to the rest of chapter 1; verses 5 through 16, which is a very interesting passage; it compares and contrasts good Bible teachers with false teachers. In verse 5, Paul basically tells Titus to ordain the good teachers; and then Paul goes on to the give the qualifications for good teachers, for bishops; and then, next, in verses 10 and 11, Paul continues the thought of verse 5, in that Paul tells Titus why he wants him to ordain the good teachers: Paul wanted Titus to ordain the good teachers, in order to differentiate them from the false teachers.

So let’s go ahead and read the passage; Titus 1, verses 5 through 16:

“5 For this cause left I thee in Crete, that thou shouldest set in order the things that are wanting, and ordaine Elders in euery citie, as I had appointed thee.”
6 If any be blamelesse, the husband of one wife, hauing faithfull children, not accused of riot, or vnruly.
7 For a Bishop must be blameles, as the steward of God: not selfewilled, not soone angry, not giuen to wine, no striker, not giuen to filthie lucre,
8 But a louer of hospitality, a louer of good men, sober, iust, holy, temperate,
9 Holding fast the faithfull word, as hee hath beene taught, that he may bee able by sound doctrine, both to exhort and to conuince the gainsayers.
10 For there are many vnruly and vaine talkers and deceiuers, specially they of the circumcision:
11 Whose mouthes must be stopped, who subuert whole houses, teaching things which they ought not, for filthie lucres sake.
12 One of themselues, euen a Prophet of their owne, said: The Cretians are alway lyers, euill beasts, slow bellies.
13 This witnesse is true: wherefore rebuke them sharpely that they may be sound in the faith;
14 Not giuing heede to Iewish fables, and commandements of men that turne from the trueth.
15 Unto the pure all things are pure, but vnto them that are defiled, and vnbeleeuing, is nothing pure: but euen their mind and conscience is defiled.
16 They professe that they know God; but in workes they deny him, being abominable, and disobedient, and vnto euery good worke reprobate.”

Alright, first of all, let’s pair verse 5, with verses 10 and 11; in verse 5, Paul told Titus to “ordaine Elders in euery citie.” And then, in verses 10 and 11, Paul says why he wanted elders ordained; he says, quote: “For there are many vnruly and vaine talkers and deceiuers, specially they of the circumcision: whose mouthes must be stopped, who subuert whole houses, teaching things which they ought not …” So Paul wanted the good teachers, the good bishops, officially ordained because there were a bunch of false teachers in those cities who were leading people astray; and so Paul wanted the good teachers officially ordained in order to differentiate them from the false teachers.

And we can learn a couple things from this; first of all, the clear indication is that these cities already had functioning churches. There were already people teaching the Bible, and so the clear indication is that this teaching was going on in various churches; whether the churches were in homes, or wherever. And it was the false teachers that were in, and around these churches, that needed to be dealt with.

This situation harkens back to what Paul warned the church at Ephesus about, before he left that church; Paul told them that false teachers would rise up among them too. In Acts 20, starting at verse 28, Paul said to the elders of the church at Ephesus, quote:

“Take heed therefore vnto your selues, & to all the flocke, ouer the which the holy Ghost hath made you ouerseers, to feed the Church of God, which he hath purchased with his own blood. For I know this, that after my departing shall grieuous wolues enter in among you, not sparing the flocke. Also of your owne selues shal men arise, speaking peruerse things, to draw away disciples after them” (Acts 20:28-30).

So Paul warned the Ephesians that false teachers would both enter in their church, from the outside, and also rise up from among them. And that’s what was happening at the churches at Crete too, where Titus was; which is why Paul had Titus stay in Crete and ordain the good teachers.

And here’s the reason that I want you to notice that these churches had started before any church leaders were officially ordained. It’s because there’s a false doctrine, among our Independent Baptist brethren, that says that Christians aren’t allowed to start a church unless they first have an ordained bishop leading them.

The common practice among Independent Baptists is that an existing pastor first trains up and ordains a man, before he, or any group of believers, can go out and start a new church. And there’s nothing wrong with doing it that way; I mean, whatever works, works. But the problem is that some Baptists say this is the only way you can do it; they say that you can’t start a church unless an existing pastor basically first gives his permission for that new church to start, via the ordination process. But that’s ridiculous. There’s nothing in the Bible that says you can’t start a church unless you first have an ordained bishop. In fact, the biblical example is of the opposite order: churches had already started, and men were already leading those churches before any of those church leaders were officially ordained… So the ordination process is not something you have to do before you start a church, as is commonly practiced today. The ordination process, as seen here, in the book of Titus, is simply an official stamp of approval that’s given to the church leaders who are already doing a good job leading their church, albeit unofficially.

And what makes this false, you-have-to-get-ordained-first doctrine so dangerous is that some Baptists will say that any church that doesn’t have an ordained bishop is an illegitimate church. And some Baptists will even attack churches that don’t have an ordained bishop, and these Baptists will even try to shut down these churches… I mean, it’s craziness; instead of praying for and edifying and trying to help new churches, like Paul did, many Independent Baptists spend their time trying to destroy new churches. This shows you the destructive nature of getting caught up in false doctrine. And why we should check all of our Baptist traditions, to make sure they line up with the Bible.

You know, in Acts, chapter 14, you can also see that churches were started before any church leaders were officially ordained in them. In Acts 14:21 it says, “… they returned againe to Lystra, and to Iconium, and Antioch.” And in verse 23 it says, quote: “And when they had ordeined them Elders in euery Church, and had prayed with fasting, they commended them to the Lord, on whom they beleeued.” So, just like in the cities of Crete, the cities of Lystra, Iconium, and Antioch already had functioning churches, and so they already head men leading those churches, before any of the men were officially ordained. Verse 23 says, and when they had ordained them elders in every church; so, again, that means that the churches already existed before the ordination process.

So what are the qualifications of a church leader? Well let’s look, again, at the qualifications of a Bishop, starting at Titus 1, verse 6; which reads: “If any be blamelesse, the husband of one wife, hauing faithfull children, not accused of riot, or vnruly.” So, in order for a church leader to be officially ordained as a bishop, he must be blameless. And what does it mean to be blameless? Well for one thing, it means he’s the husband of one wife, and that he has faithful children, children who are not accused of riot or of being unruly.

So an officially ordained bishop should be married. And a bishop’s children need to be obedient to him… When it says that a bishop must have faithful children, it’s talking about the children being faithful, or obedient, to their father, the bishop. And we know this because the verse, itself, defines what it means by “faithful”; it says, “hauing faithfull children, not accused of riot, or vnruly.” So “faithful,” in that context, means “not accused of riot or unruly”; the kids have to be obedient.

But some churches, today, take that phrase, “having faithful children,” to mean that a bishop’s children have to be saved; that all the children have to believe on Jesus, or their father can’t be a bishop… A long time back, I went to a church that made one of their bishops step down after his teenage daughter said that she didn’t really believe on Jesus.

So take this as another cautionary tale on the importance of getting your doctrine right- and the importance of getting your doctrine directly from the King James Bible. In the KJV, it’s clear that “faithful” means “obedient” in that verse. But that old church that I went to, didn’t rely on the King James Bible; they went back to the Greek, so to speak, and that’s how they got that false doctrine saying that all of a bishop’s kids had to be saved… Getting your doctrine from anywhere other than directly from the KJV is very dangerous… I mean, in this case, misinterpreting just one verse wrong made that church lose a good bishop.

So why does a bishop need to have obedient children?… Well you can find the answer to that question in 1 Timothy 3, verses 4 and 5, which says that a bishop must, quote: “… ruleth well his owne house, hauing his children in subiection with all grauitie. (For if a man know not how to rule his owne house, how shall he take care of the Church of God?).” So how a man rules his children will tell you how he’ll lead a church. If his own children won’t listen to him, then a church isn’t going to listen to him either.

And here’s an interesting application of all of that: if you’re the child of a bishop, or the child of a pastor, you have more responsibility, before God, to obey your earthly father. You kids- You (point at them) kids have more responsibility before God. You’re actually participating in your father’s ministry by being obedient to him. And, conversely, you can hurt your father’s ministry if you’re disobedient.

So, as the child of a bishop, you have more responsibility, and you have more opportunity; more opportunity in that you get to participate in the ministry just by obeying your parents. So you have the opportunity to earn eternal rewards just by being a good kid.

Continuing, now, let’s look at Titus 1, verses 7 and 8: “For a Bishop must be blameles, as the steward of God: not selfewilled, not soone angry, not giuen to wine, no striker, not giuen to filthie lucre, but a louer of hospitality, a louer of good men, sober, iust, holy, temperate.” So, again, a bishop must be blameless; and, here, blameless means that he’s not self-willed, and not soon angry, and not given to wine, and not a striker; and that he doesn’t love money, and that he’s sober, just, holy, and temperate.

You know, it’s nice to be given these very specific qualifications for a bishop. Because, that way, we know exactly how a bishop is supposed to behave. 1 Timothy 3 adds to this list of the necessary characteristics of a bishop or deacon. It says he must also be patient, and not covetous ( 1 Tim 3:3), and not a novice (v4), and have a good report from them that are without (v7), and that, as a bishop, he shouldn’t be double tongued (v8).

And, you know, a lot of these characteristics can be summed up thusly: a bishop needs to be a nice, and gentle person; when it says he must not be soon angry, and a lover of good men, and temperate, and patient, and not a brawler; all those things add up to gentleness; a bishop’s gotta be gentle. Which also coincides with 2 Timothy 2, which says, quote: “And the servant of the Lord must not strive; but be gentle unto all men, apt to teach, patient, in meekness instructing those that oppose themselves …” (2 Tim 2:24-25).

So when you envision how a bishop should be, envision a gentle, patient and meek man. I point this out because, again, some of our poor, misguided Baptist brethren, have this false impression that a pastor needs to be a hard man, who’s always yelling and rebuking everybody. But that’s not the picture that the Bible paints of a pastor. The Bible says that he must be gentle unto all men. And so if you know a bishop whose preaching style is defined by how loud he yells, that man may not be qualified to be a bishop; he’s certainly not following the biblical mandate for how a bishop should behave.

A man can be a hellfire and brimstone preacher, without being mean or hard-hearted. 2 Timothy says that a bishop must in meekness instruct those that oppose themselves. So a bishop should definitely instruct those who oppose themselves, but he should do it meekly… Last week, Pastor Yaghtin preached a powerful sermon on the reality of hell, but he preached it in meekness. A bishop can preach the hard truths while still being meek… In fact, that’s how he’s supposed to do it.

Note also that Titus says, in verse 7, that a bishop must be, quote: “not giuen to wine,” and also, “not giuen to filthie lucre.” That phrase “not given to” obviously means “not given to too much of it”; a bishop mustn’t be given to drinking too much wine, or chasing after too much money. It certainly doesn’t mean that a bishop has to completely abstain from wine, or completely abstain from money. The clear, face-value definition of “not given to” means “not given to too much.”

Now, in Titus 1:9, it says that a bishop must also “Hold[ing] fast the faithfull word, as hee hath beene taught, that he may bee able by sound doctrine, both to exhort and to conuince the gainsayers.” So a bishop must hold fast to good doctrine; that is, he must hold fast to the right gospel, and he must have the right doctrines, in general.

Note that it also says a bishop needs to be able to, quote: “exhort and to conuince the gainsayers.” So who are these gainsayers that a bishop has to both exhort and to convince? Well the gainsayers are the false teachers, according to verse 11, and they’re also described as reprobate in verse 16. And it’s very significant that it says these reprobate false teachers can be exhorted, but it’s especially significant that it says that they can be convinced… Because some people, today, think that the term “reprobate” means someone who can’t be convinced of anything, when it comes to the Bible. But that’s simply not true. Reprobates can be convinced; it says so right here. In fact, one of the qualifications of a bishop is that he’s able to convince reprobates of what the Bible says.

So let’s go ahead and read verses 10 through 16 again, but, this time, keep in mind what it’s saying about reprobates, in particular… Actually, let’s start reading at the end of verse 9…

“9 … that he [the bishop, that he…] may bee able by sound doctrine, both to exhort and to conuince the gainsayers.
10 For there are many vnruly and vaine talkers and deceiuers, specially they of the circumcision:
11 Whose mouthes must be stopped, who subuert whole houses, teaching things which they ought not, for filthie lucres sake.
12 One of themselues, euen a Prophet of their owne, said: The Cretians are alway lyers, euill beasts, slow bellies.
13 This witnesse is true: wherefore rebuke them sharpely that they may be sound in the faith;
14 Not giuing heede to Iewish fables, and commandements of men that turne from the trueth.
15 Unto the pure all things are pure, but vnto them that are defiled, and vnbeleeuing, is nothing pure: but euen their mind and conscience is defiled.
16 They professe that they know God; but in workes they deny him, being abominable, and disobedient, and vnto euery good worke reprobate.”

Now when you look at the characteristics of these false teachers, a lot of them are the opposite of the characteristics of the good teachers, the bishops. In verse 10, it says that these false teachers are unruly, whereas earlier it said that the good teachers, the bishops must be blameless, and have children who are not unruly; and also it says that the bishops must be temperate, and not self-willed, and not soon angry. Ok? so these temperate good teachers are pretty much the opposite of the unruly false teachers.

And verse 10 says that the false teachers are vain talkers, and deceivers; and verse 11 says that the false teachers subvert whole houses for filthy lucre’s sake. Whereas the bishops are the opposite of vain talkers; verse 9 says that the bishops must hold fast the faithful word, and have sound doctrine. So the false teachers teach vain, worthless things; whereas the good teachers teach sound doctrine.

You can also contrast the false teachers’ motivation, with what motivates the good teachers. Verse 11 says that the false teachers teach for, quote: “filthy lucre’s sake”; so false teachers teach lies in order to make money. Whereas verse 7 says that a bishop must not be given to filthy lucre; so the good teachers are not motivated by money.

And, you know, when Jesus warned us about how to identify false prophets, he said that we would know them by their fruit. And this matches up with what Titus 1:16 says: that the false teachers profess to know God, but in works they deny him; so their works show that they’re false teachers. They’re works reveal who they are on the inside; verse 16 ends by saying the false teachers are, quote: “unto every good work reprobate”; so they can’t even really do good works.

This shows us that we can identify a false prophet, or a false teacher by their fruit, by their works. They say that they know God, but their works reveal that they really don’t. If you’re testing a Bible teacher, or the leader of a church to see if he really knows God or not, test him by his works; see how he lives his life.

Now, eventually, the good teachers and the false teachers will, or should go head-to-head. In fact, one of the qualifications of a bishop is that he must be able to go head-to-head with false teachers; it says that a bishop must be able to both exhort and convince the reprobate false teachers. So that’s a mandate for good teachers to publicly challenge false teachers, and to be able to refute their doctrine.

You know, some people get mad at Pastor Yaghtin for refuting false teachers and false doctrines in his sermons. Most of this criticism comes from people online, but there’s actually a lot of people who try to get Pastor Yaghtin to stop refuting false teachers. But those people are wrong; exhorting false teachers is actually commanded of bishops, here, in the book of Titus.

Now the fact that it says bishops must be able to, not only exhort, but also convince these reprobate, false teachers, speaks volumes; because it shows us that reprobates are convincible; it shows that reprobates can learn biblical truths. Again, that false reprobate doctrine, that’s out there, says that if someone’s a reprobates he can’t be convinced of biblical truths. But Titus 1 says that they can be convinced. In fact, if you look again at Titus 1:13, it says this, of the reprobates; it says, quote: “…rebuke them sharpely that they may be sound in the faith.” So not only can reprobates be convinced of the truth, they can become sound in the faith. That means that they can be saved! Being sound in the faith is talking about salvation; reprobates can be saved.

The false reprobate doctrine, that’s put forth by false teachers like Steven Anderson, out of Arizona, teach a subtle, limited atonement gospel; these false teachers will never directly admit it, but they’re saying that the gospel isn’t powerful enough to save certain classes of people. Like reprobates. But this is very dangerous false doctrine, because it can stop Christians from sharing the gospel, in some cases. It also makes some saved people question their own salvation… The gospel is the power of God vnto saluation, to euery one that beleeueth. Every One… People who try to change and limit the gospel are false teachers; and we must beware of them.

Ok, so that concludes our study on Titus, chapter 1. Good teachers must be gentle and meek, and able to stand up to the false teachers. May God raise up many good teachers and pastors and bishops today, who protect the Church of God from all the false doctrine that’s out there. Let’s pray…

titus1

One Coment, RSS

  • John R. Anglin

    says on:
    December 16, 2016 at 12:13 am

    “…That means that they can be saved! Being sound in the faith is talking about salvation; reprobates can be saved…” It is very good to hear this truth! Thank you!!!

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